Ongoing Project 
Inventory of Anicinabe Heritage

Initiated in 2019, this project is a far-reaching process designed to reclaim Anicinabe heritage. To better understand who we are, we needed to begin an exercise in memory.  Research started for the digital repatriation of Anicinabe visual symbols. Returning these elements to the Anicinabe Nation will promote the revitalisation of the culture and its transmission to future generations.

Present a traditional object

Ongoing Project
Inventory of Anicinabe Heritage

Initiated in 2019, this project is a far-reaching process designed to reclaim Anicinabe heritage. To better understand who we are, we needed to begin an exercise in memory.  Research started for the digital repatriation of Anicinabe visual symbols. Returning these elements to the Anicinabe Nation will promote the revitalisation of the culture and its transmission to future generations.

Present a traditional object

 “This project is a work of reparation and reappropriation, with the hope that the transmission of our heritage can get back on course.”

Richard Kistabish, president of Minwashin

Show us your traditional objects!

  • Finding Anicinabe cultural symbols.

  • Digitally preserve cultural heritage by creating a data base of Anicinabe archives.

  • Ensuring the transmission of Anicinabe heritage to future generations.

Present a traditional object

« Ni kekina 8atcitcikemakanan, nit’enantekanan acitc ni masinipikanan nisitenakonon acitc ni  Kekina 8atcitokoman e ici8eki8ak. »

“Our symbols, colours and designs distinguish and identify us and represent who we are.”

Process

The inspiration for this project comes from an initiative instigated by the coop Nitaskinan of the Atikamekw Nation. A few years ago, the coop undertook the colossal endeavour of recovering the symbols and identity of the Atikamekw Nation.

With the help of our partners, we are currently identifying the artefacts stored in museums or kept in family homes. Historians are also searching through archives for mentions or descriptions of symbols.

“It’s like looking for our footprints in time.”

– Richard Kistabish

In collaboration with Anicinabe communities, discussion tables were created to examine the items gathered and identify federating symbols. The full reports outlining the process and the results will be shared with the communities.

Current Progress

Currently, close to 800 artefacts have been identified within the network of North American museums and over 78,000 pages of archives have been gathered. A series of virtual consultations will serve to catalogue the objects preserved by families in each community. This is also an opportunity to hear and record their history.

The objects and stories will be accessible to all First Nation people through a virtual database currently in development. Many objects will even be presented in 3D.

Meegwetch to our partners!